09 Mar

May 12-20 – West Austin Studio Tour comes to Neill-Cochran

Neill-Cochran House Museum goes WEST

An overlay exhibit featuring 15 local contemporary artists

Seeger.Travis - woven sphere (1600x1600)
macqueen.lucy-Before (1600x1600)
Fritz.Julie-3 (1600x1600)
Finfrock.Cheryl-In Between Breaths _ Long Before Words_12inches x 16inches_acrylic on claybord_2016
Sarkin.Shakti_PedernalesFalls_L (1600x1600)
LAMPLUGH.DAVID-IMAGE#3 (1110x1110)
Fox.Kristen-Agave II (1275x1600)
Finch.Paul - Vanessa (1600x1600)
Primeaux 1 (960x960)
Holman.Sona -A Delicate Balance
NewEraScans
Cook. Thomas-ThePleiadsFolio (944x944)

The furnishings and architecture of the Neill-Cochran House Museum ground us in a handful of different times; to walk in the door is to in part step into the 19th and early-20th centuries. As historians and preservationists, what we like most about hosting individual artists for WEST is that it allows us to see the difference between the Austins of the 1850s, 1870s, 1900s, and so on and the Austin we live in. Does that difference go beyond the modernization we can easily imagine or is it better thought of as a change in tastes and aesthetics in its own right?

However one reads our historic site against this display of the creativity of our present, we think that you’ll enjoy this unique exhibition of Austin artists in one of the oldest extant structures in town.

Exhibition Hours – WEST 2017

Saturday and Sunday, May 12-13 – 11am to 6pm (FREE)

Tuesday, May 15 – 11:30am – 1:30pm (FREE)

Thursday, May 17* – 6pm – 9pm – Exhibition Reception ($25 ticket)

Saturday and Sunday, May 19-20 – 11am to 6pm (FREE)

Hat’s off to our artists! 15% of artwork sales benefit the Neill-Cochran House Museum

Exhibition Reception

Thursday, May 17th, 6PM to 9PM

Join us for an evening of conversation and complimentary refreshments to celebrate the opening of our third cooperative exhibition of contemporary art in our unique historic space.

On site parking is available free behind the museum; additional neighborhood parking is available on Leon, Robbins, and 23rd streets. Paid garage parking is available at 23rd & Pearl streets.

28 Feb

The War at Home: World War I Comes to Texas

Texas and the Great War

On June 28, 1914, a Serbian terrorist assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, along with his pregnant wife Sophie, in Sarajevo.  This single, albeit horrific, event over 5,000 miles away from Austin, Texas reverberated across the world as much of Europe became embroiled in war.  Americans watched from the sidelines for over two years as hundreds of thousands died, hoping to avoid military engagement while providing supplies to the Allied forces of France, Britain, and Belgium.

When this all changed in early 1917, Texas found itself at the heart of the United State’s decision to go to war.  In January 1917, German Foreign Minister Arthur Zimmerman sent an encoded telegram to the President of Mexico in which he encouraged Mexico to join the Central Powers in exchange for support in the reconquest of parts of the United States once claimed by Mexico (Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona).  Intercepted and decoded by British cryptographers, the “Zimmermann Telegram” was the fuse that compelled Congress to declare war on Germany on April 6, 1917.

Over the eighteen short months the United States was at war, 4.7 million Americans served.  53,402 soldiers were killed in action, while even more (63,114) died of disease or other causes, the vast majority from the Spanish Flu epidemic.  Here in Texas, 198,000 were in the armed forces along with 450 women who served as nurses.  Over 5,000 Texans died, more than one-third succumbing to Spanish Flu without ever deploying to Europe.

This exhibit takes us back in time 100 years to life as experienced by Texans during World War I.  The war was disruptive to family life in many ways.  Enlistments certainly separated families, but everyday life was also impacted in many ways, from pressure to purchase war bonds, to the impact of the Spanish Flu, to a certain level of militarization of society, and food rationing.  Finally, the image of the “dough-boy” that has come down to us today is of a white American soldier.  Mexican-Americans, African-Americans, and German-Americans in many ways struggled to prove their Americanness while the country was at war, a struggle that was as acute in Texas as in the rest of the country.

The Cochran family lived in our historic house throughout the war era.  Thomas B. Cochran had died in 1913, but his wife and five children (three daughters and two sons) all participated in the war effort in some way.  Using their experience as well as the experiences of other Austinites as a guide, we explore the impact of the Great War on the lives of the people who remained on the home front and the relationships they maintained with soldiers who served elsewhere and abroad.

Service Flag
Red Cross Deep Eddy
Negros Hold Thrift Stamp Rally
cochrantb

Opening Lecture: The Great War Effort

Dr. Scott Wolford, University of Texas at Austin

Presented in partnership with the Bullock Texas State History Museum and the Friends of the Governor’s Mansion, join us and Dr. Wolford for a discussion of the role that everyday Americans played in the nation’s efforts during the Great War.

17 Aug

Is Now The Dream?

From the other side of the world

“Though these are but the faces of dolls, I am entranced with their unique expressions, and the secrets and mystery they suggest. It is left to the imagination to flesh out each one more fully and hear her poetry from across the centuries.”

– Pat Brown

Is Now the Dream? Hina-ningyō Portraits + Landscapes, on display in our downstairs gallery from January 17th through May 6th, features the work of Pat Brown, a local Austin photographer, who explores the cultural aesthetic of Japan, both past and present.

Hina-ningyō—hand-crafted Japanese dolls collected by the photographer—represent members of the Japanese imperial courts. The photographer’s work brings out the unique expressiveness in each doll, revealing the human and poetic dimensions of their unchanging and timeless expressions.

The title of the exhibit is taken from a poem written by a woman who served in the court of Empress Tokoku, who lived in the 12th century. Describing the decline of her court and thus her way of life, she writes:

Is now the dream?
or was long ago the dream?
I wander on, lost—
unable to convince myself
that this is reality.

Landscape and architectural photographs of Japan round out the exhibit, suggesting what one might have seen during the Edo period prior to Commodore Perry’s opening of Japan to the West in the 1850s, and thus, at the same time Abner Cook was completing our historic house in a young Austin, Texas.

ReceptionFeb. 3 (3)
Kita-Ku, Kyoto
Lady Izumi
Mount Fuji from Hakone
ReceptionFeb. 3 (5)
Prince Kinashikaru
Black Pine - Takayama
Ono no Komachi
ReceptionFeb. 3 (2)
Chiyojo II
Blossoming Tree - Takayama - Hachikemmachi
The Shinkyo Bridge Spanning the Daiya River, Nikko II

Is Now The Dream? Opening Reception: Saturday, February 3rd 4:00 to 6:00pm

Join us and local photographer Pat Brown from 4pm to 6pm on Saturday, February 3rd for a special look at this exhibit. Complimentary refreshments served.

16 Aug

March 30 – Easter Egg Dye-O-Rama

Easter 2016 - 4
Easter 2016 - 3
Easter 2016 Eggs

What is Easter Egg Dye-o-Rama?

Hands-on fun? Check!
An Easter event that doesn’t revolve around candy or plastic? Check!
Multiple indoor and outdoor activities suitable for ages 3 & up? Check!
Free? No need to RSVP? Double Check!

Join us this Good Friday for one of our most fun-filled community events of the year, as we open up the house and grounds for an afternoon of old-fashioned
Easter egg dyeing, lawn games, and a chance to get to know one of Austin’s oldest landmarks at your own pace.

Easter egg dyers of all skill levels are welcome! Bring your own boiled (or blown!) eggs and we’ll provide wax resists, vinegar baths, and dyes, and, of course, take care of all of the clean-up. (We’ll also have prepared eggs available for purchase on a first-come, first-served basis)

When you’re done working on eggs, enjoy a round of badminton under the shade of our 140 year old pecan tree and try a mango-hibiscus iced tea, a fresh-squeezed lemonade, and maybe even a rice krispie, too!

Ok! What do I need to bring and when does it all start?

Friday, March 30th
12pm to 4pm

Bring your own blown or boiled eggs (no raw eggs, please!) and we will supply all the dyes and decorations you need free! We will also be providing blown and boiled eggs on a first come, first served basis at the following prices:

Blown egg – $2 each
Boiled eggs – $3 for 6 or $5 for 12

No RSVP required! Follow our facebook page for event updates and to invite friends to join in the fun!

Parking is free to visitors in the museum lot located off of 23rd street. Additional paid parking is available at the University Towers parking garage (map) at 22nd 1/2 street and Pearl.

Don’t forget to thank your volunteers!

We simply could not continue to host Easter Egg Dye-O-Rama without the help of our friends at Generation Serve. There’s nothing little about the impact they have here and elsewhere!

16 Aug

February 25 – The Impact of NASA on the Lone Star State

If you’ve heard the phrase, “Houston, we have a problem,” you know that the presence of the Johnson Space Center has made an undeniable mark on Texas and on the world. Join us and NASA historian Dr. Jennifer Ross-Nazzal for a look at this unique part of Texas history’s first five decades.

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